Grief and Loss

Coping with the loss of a close friend or family member may be one of the hardest challenges that many of us face. When we lose a spouse, sibling or parent our grief can be particularly intense. Loss is understood as a natural part of life, but we can still be overcome by shock and confusion, leading to prolonged periods of sadness or depression. The sadness typically diminishes in intensity as time passes, but grieving is an important process in order to overcome these feelings and continue to embrace the time you had with your loved one.

Everyone reacts differently to death and employs personal coping mechanisms for grief. Research shows that most people can recover from loss on their own through the passage of time if they have social support and healthy habits. It may take months or a year to come to terms with a loss. There is no “normal” time period for someone to grieve. Don’t expect to pass through phases of grief either, as new research suggests that most people do not go through stages as progressive steps.

If your relationship with the deceased was difficult, this will also add another dimension to the grieving process. It may take some time and thought before you are able to look back on the relationship and adjust to the loss.

Human beings are naturally resilient, considering most of us can endure loss and then continue on with our own lives. But some people may struggle with grief for longer periods of time and feel unable to carry out daily activities. Those with severe grief may be experiencing complicated grief. These individuals could benefit from the help of a psychologist or another licensed mental health professional with a specialization in grief.

Other Therapies:

Couples conflict is characterized by individuals in a committed relationship who “act out” with each other most often threatening the bond of the relationship.

When children and adolescents are faced with life stressors, the adverse effects surface through behavioral, social or emotional issues that are difficult to pinpoint.

Family therapy involves individuals that are in the family system who are able to meet with the therapist concerning a presenting problem which has surfaced.

An eating disorder is an illness defined by abnormal eating habits that affect a person’s physical or mental health.

Anxiety is a disorder characterized by a state of excessive uneasiness and apprehension, typically with compulsive behavior or panic attacks.

Distress is common following a chronic disease diagnosis.

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest.

Stress affects our lives on a daily basis, and it is essential to have a well-rounded approach to overcome it.

Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.

Self Image relates to how we feel about our body and our appearance.

LGBTQ – According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, individuals of the LGBTQ community are often 3 times more likely to experience a mental health condition such as major depression or generalized anxiety disorder.

Work Stress is…

Performance Anxiety is…

Trauma / PTSD is…

Motivational Issues is…

Learning disability refers to a person’s inability or difficulty to learn in a manner that is typical for their age or developmental stage.

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